Text: Various, “International Poe Bibliography
Source: Poe Studies / Dark Romanticism, December 1987, Vol. XX, No. 2, 20:36-45


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[page 36:]

International Poe Bibliography

Bibliography Committee Members: Maurice Bennett, Amy Horning Marshall, Tohru Nakamura, E. Kate Stewart, Bruce I. Weiner

This checklist, which supplements ~International Poe Bibliography: 1983-1985” appearing in Poe Studies, 19 (1986), 11-23, features primarily items from 1986, yet includes, too, selected items from 1983, 1984, and 1985. This listing was compiled by a Committee headed by Richard Kopley, The Pennsylvania State University/DuBois Campus; members include Kent P. Ljungquist, Worcester Polytechnic Institute; Amy Horning Marschall, The Johns Hopkins University; Tohru Nakamura, Ibaraki University; E. Kate Stewart; and Bruce I. Weiner, St. Lawrence University. This listing is augmented by a section on reviews and review essays concerning Poe scholarship compiled by a new member of the Bibliography Committee, Maurice Bennett, University of Maryland, College Park. The Committee will be pleased to received offprints from any source. Send offprints to Richard Kopley, Department of English, The Pennsylvania State University/DuBois Campus, DuBois, Pennsylvania 15801.

The Committee wishes to thank American Literary Scholarship for granting permission to include listings from its annual review-essay on Poe criticism and scholarship, and Mississippi Quarterly for granting permission to include listings from its annual bibliography of criticism and scholarship on Southern literature.

Andriano, Joseph. “Archetypal Projection in ‘Ligeia’: A

Post-Jungian Reading, Poe Studies, 19 (1986), 2731. [The numerous signifiera that surround Ligeia can be reconciled under one sign: the anima or feminine unconscious soul of man.]

Arima, Tetsuo. “A Mirror set against Another Mirror — An Essay on ‘William Wilson,‘” Bulletin of College of General Education, Tohoku University, 44 (December 1985), 132-154. [Argues for the greatness and orginality of “William Wilson” in view of the story’s form.]

Asahara, Yoshio. “The History of Baudelaire’s Translation of Poe, Bulletin of Atomi Gakuin Junior College, 21 (March 1985), 1-13. [The author compares the text [column 2:] of “Murders in the Rue Morgue” with Baudelaire’s translation, consulting Lemonnier’s commentaries.]

Asher, James. “Poe’s Lean Philadelphia Years,” Philadelphia Inquirer Magazine, 26 October 1986, p. 34. [Briefly recounts Poe’s life in Philadelphia; cites Dwight Thomas dissertation.]

Bachinger, K. E. “How Sherwood Forest Became the Valley of Many-Colored Grass: Peacock’s Maid Marian as A Source for Poe’s ‘Eleonora,‘n American Notes and Queries, 24 (1986), 72-75. [Notes scenic features adapted by Poe.]

Bandy, W. T. “Corrections to the Hyneman Bibliography,” Poe Studies, 19 (June 1986), 24. [Corrections regarding items by A. Lawson.]

Beaver, Harold. The Great American Masquerade (Totowa, N. J.: Barnes and Noble, 1985), pp. 80-87. [Relates Poe’s contribution to Southern literature and his appeal in France to a tradition of masquerade in American literature.]

Bennett, Maurice J. “The Infamy and the Ecstasy: Crime, Art, and Metaphysics in Edgar Allan Poe‘a ‘William Wilson’ and Jorge Luis Borge’s ‘Deutsches Requiem,‘” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 107-123. [Covert metaphysical implications of Poe’s tale are expanded into philosophical speculation by Borges.]

Bloom, Harold, ed. Edgar Allan Poe (New York: Chelsea House, 1985). [Collection of reprinted essays, introduced by essay highly critical of Poe.]

Bohm, Arnd. “A German Source for Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The Raven,‘” Comparative Literature Studies, 23 (1986), 310-323. [Suggests parallels in theme and content between “The Raven” and Tieck’s “Phantasus.”]

Bowe, Nicola Gordon. Harrv Clarke: His Graphic Art (Mountrath, Ireland: The Dolmen Press, 1983). [Contributes to our knowledge of Poe illustration.]

Byer, Robert H. “Mysteries of the City: A Reading of Poe’s ‘The Man of the Crowd,‘n Ideology and Classic American Literature, eds. Sacvan Bercovitch and Myra Jehlen (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986), pp. 221-246. [Draws on Marxist and critical theory to account for Poe’s urban vision.] [page 37:]

Carlson, Thomas C. “Romanian Translations of ‘The Raven,‘” Poe Studies, 18 (December 1985), 22-24. [Survey of thirty-two Romanian translations of “The Raven” from 1890-1980.]

Clifton, Michael. “Down Hecate’s Chain: Infernal Inspiration in Three of Poe’s Tales,” Nineteenth-Century Literature, 41 (1986), 217-227. [Imagery associated with Hecate in “The Duc de L‘Omelette” suggests anxieties about the creative unconscious in other tales, notably “Usher,” “The Pit and the Pendulum,” and “A Descent into the Maelstrom.”]

Dameron, J. Lasley. “Poe’s Auguste Dupin,” No Fairer Land: Studies in Southern Literature Borges 1900, eds. J. L. Dameron and James W. Mathews (Troy, N. Y.: Whitson, 1986), pp. 159-171. [Revised version of an essay that appeared in the Tennessee Philological Bulletin, 17 (1980), 5-15.]

Day, William Patrick. In the Circles of Fear and Desire: A Study of Gothic Fantasy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985), pp. 60-61, 129-31, and passim. [Brief discussion of Poe’s tales to define aspects of gothic fantasy.]

De Grazia, Emilio. “Poe’s Other Beautiful Women,” Literature and Lore of the Sea, ed. Patricia Ann Carlson (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1986), pp. 176-184. [Explores sea motifs in tales about women and in Eureka.]

Dwight, Eleanor. “Edith Wharton and ‘The Cask of Amontillado,‘” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 49-57. [Poe’s tale influenced Wharton’s “The Duchess at Prayer.”]

Ensley, Helen. “Metrical Ambiguty in the Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe,” No Fairer Land: Studies in Southern Literature Before 1900, eds. J. Lasley Dameron and James W. Mathews (Troy, N. Y.: Whitson, 1986), pp. 144158. [Analyzes rhythmical variety of “Spirits of the Dead,” “The Valley of Unrest,” and “A Dream Within a Dream.”]

Epstein, Daniel Mark. “The Man Who Owns Midnight,” Philadelphia Inquirer Magazine, 26 October 1986, pp. 34, 36. [On Poe as “a great American ghost.”]

Fetterly, Judith. “Reading about Reading: ‘A Jury of Her Peers,’ ‘The Murders in the Rue Morgue,’ and ‘The Yellow Wallpaper,‘n Gender and Reading: Essays on Readers, Texts, and Context, eds. Elizabeth A. Flynn and Patrocinio P. Schweickart (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986), pp. 147-164. [Poe’s tale facilitates and exposes a masculinist interpretation.!

Fisher, Benjamin Franklin, IV. “‘The Flights of a Good Man’s Mind’: Gothic Fantasy in Poe’s ‘The Assignation,‘” Modern Languages Studies, 16 (1986), 2734. [Notes fantastic imaginings of suspect narrator in Poe’s tale.]

————————. “Introduction: The Shadow of Poe,” Poe and Our Times: Influence, and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. i-iii. [Offers overview of volume’s [column 2:] contents, which attest to “many-sided Poe.”]

————————. “Poe, Stephen King, and John Dickson Carr; Or, How to Recreate a Popular Author in Your Own Image,” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 99-106. [Carr’s adaptation of elements from Poe’s “Masque of the Red Death” is more artful than King’s in The Shining.]

————————. “The Urban Scene of Edgar Allan Poe,” Publications of the Mississippi Philological Association (1986), 39-50. [Survey of Poe’s references to city life, from allusions to ancient metropolises in his early works to his handling of more contemporary localities.]

Forclaz, Roger. “Edgar Poe and France: Toward the End of a Myth?” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 9-17. [General statement about the evolution of Poe’s French image since the time of Baudelaire; translated by James Kelly Morris.]

Fried, Debra. “Repetition, Refrain, and Epitaph,” ELH, 53 (Fall 1986), 615-632. [Treats refrains in Poe and Whitman.]

Friedan, Ken. Genius and Monologue (Ithaca, N. Y.: Cornell University Press, 1985). [Chapter on Poe, pp. 154168: subverting the traditions of Richardson’s epistolary novels and Coleridge’s conversational poems, Poe’s narrative monologues reveal a deviant fictive subject whose “genius” originates in perversity.]

Fusco, Richard. “Poe and the Perfectibility of Man,” Poe Studies, 19 (1986), 1-6. [Surveys eighteenth-century attitudes toward perfectibility, and discusses philosophers whom Poe cites in “Lionizing” and “The Landscape Garden.”]

Galle, Roland. “Angstbildung im historischen Wandel von literarischer Erfahrung,” Neohelicon, 8 (1980), 43-61. [Analyzes literary representations of fear, including that in Poe’s “Pit and the Pendulum,” in order to investigate changes in both psychohistory and the literary experience.]

Gambarini, Elsa K. “La escritura como lecture: La parodia en ‘El crimen del otro’ de Horacio Quiroga,” Revista Iberoamericana, NOB. 135-136 (April-September 1986), 475-488. [Links Quiroga story with “The Cask of Amontillado.”]

Gibbs, Kenneth. “Stephen King and the Tradition of American Gothic,” Gothic, NS. (1986), 6-14. [Discusses Melville and Poe as King’s literary forebears.]

Gerber, Gerald E. “Epes Sargent and ‘The Raven,‘” Poe Studies, 19 (1986), 24. [Notes suggestive conjunction of setting, situation, and refrain in “The Raven” and Sargent’s “When the Night Wind Bewaileth” (1843).]

Goldhurst, William. “Self-Reflective Fiction by Poe: Three Tales,” Modern Language Studies, 16 (1986), 4-14. [page 38:] [Self-referential elements demonstrate Poe’s artistry in “The Oblong Box,” “The Gold-Bug,” and “The Sphinx.” ]

Gribben, Alan. “‘That Pair of Spiritual Derelicts’: The Poe-Twain Relationship,” Poe Studies, 18 (December 1985), 17-21. [Considers previous work on the Poe-Twain relationship, discusses Twain’s comments on Poe, and notes the author’s shared interest in practical jokes, premature burials, and psychological doubles.]

Hayashi, Koji.“Pym’s Voyage and Poe’s Poetics (3) — From Poe to Valery,” Memoirs of the Faculty of General Education, Ehimc University, 18 (1) (December 1985), 145-187. [Examines the images of the swan and Venus, and the creation of the universe of language, in the tradition which includes Poe, Baudelaire, and Valery.]

Hild, Mari. “Rise and Fall of the Arabesque World — Around ‘The Masque of the Red Death,‘” Doshisha Lacrature (English Literature Society, Doshisha University), 32 (March 1986).

Howes, Craig. “‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ and Elegiac Romance,” Southern Literary Journal, 19 (1986), 6878. [Applies Kenneth Bruffee’s theories of romance to tale.]

————————. “Teaching ‘Usher’ and Genre: Poe and the Introductory Literature Class,” The Journal of the Midwest Modern Languages Association, 19 (Spring 1986). [On using tale to teach both genre and genre’s limitations.]

Humphries, Jefferson. Metamorphoses of the Raven: Literary Overdeterminedness in France and the South Since Poe (Baton Rouge, La.: Louisiana State University Press, 1985). [Theoretical treatment of Poe and his influence.]

Irwin, John T. “Mysteries We Reread, Mysteries of Rereading: Poe, gorges, and the Analytical Detective Story; Also, Lacan, Derrida, and Johnson,” MLN, 101 (1986), 1168-1215. [Examines the numerical-geometrical structure of “The Purloined Letter” in probing analytical solutions that conserve a sense of mystery.!

Itoh, Shoko. “Gnostic Apocalypse in Edgar Allan Poe,” Studies in American Literature (American Literature Society of Japan), 22 (February 1986), 1-17. [Argues for Poe’s uniquely Gnostic idea of apocalypse, discusses what moved him to embrace it, and considers how dialogue technique functions in his four dialogue tales to form Poesque paradigms of salvation.]

————————. “Poe and ‘Kubla Kahn,‘” Studies in English Language and Literature (English Literature Society, Hiroshima University), 30 (January 1986), 62-77.

————————. “Poe and ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,‘” Language and Culture (The Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University), 11 (February 1985), 204-219. [Traces Poe’s development of the albatross image from such early poems as “Al Aaraaf” through Pym to “The Raven.”] [column 2:]

Ketterer, David. “Empedocles in Eureka: Addenda,” Poe Studies, 18 (December 1985), 24-25. [Five similarities between Empedocles’ view of the cosmic cycle and Poe’s suggest a serious context for Eureka.]

————————. “The Sexual Abyss: Consummation in ‘The Assignation‘” Poe Studies, 19 (1986), 7-10. [Sexual imagery, used for apparent humor, underscores tale’s “arabesque” qualities.]

Kimura, Shinichi. “The Whirl and the Pendulum — On the Suspension-Motif in Poe,” The Annual Report of Cultural Science (The Faculty of Letters, Hokkaido University), 34 (2) (February 1986), 87-106. [Interprets Pym, UA Descent into the Maelstrom,” “Mesmeric Revelation,” and Eureka as the swing and the whirl between two opposite poles.]

Kirkham, E. Bruce. “Poe’s Amontillado, One More Time,” American Notes and Queries, 24 (May-June 1986), 144-145. [Notes wordplay in Poe’s tale.]

Kopley, Richard, et al. “International Poe Bibliography: 1983-1985,” Poe Studies, 19 (1986), 11-23. [Supplements “Current Poe Bibliography,” Poe Studies, 16 (1983), 34-38, and includes relevant foreign entries.]

Levine, Stuart and Susan. “‘How-to’ Satire: Cervantes, Marryat, Poe,” Modern Languages Studies, 16 (1986), 15-26. [Discusses the prologue of Cervantes’ Don Quizote, Marryat’s “How to Write a Fashionable Novel,” and Poe’s “How to Write a Blackwood Article” as they point to later metafictional developments.]

Ljungquist, Kent. “Fitzgerald’s Homage to Poe: Female Characterization in This Side of Paradise and Tender is the Night,” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 90-98. [Allusions to “To Helen” in latter novel underscore the “terrible beauty” of Fitzgerald’s women.]

Lucas, Robert F. Edgar Allan Poe, 1809-1819: A Catalogue of Books by and about Edgar Allan Poe (Blandford, Mass., 1986). [Features the pirated British Pym, an unrecorded issue of the Philadelphia Saturday Museum containing a prospectus of the Stylus, and an unpublished manuscript poem, “Where Shall Glory Live?” allegedly by Poe.]

McDaniel, Linda E. “Roderick Usher in Our Time: Styron’s Mason Flagg,” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 137-143. [Notes that Styron in Set This House on Fire drew from “Usher” for his account of the ‘house of Flagg’ and his study of evil and insanity.]

McKeithan, D. M. “Killis Campbell (1872-1937),” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 58-74. [Biographical Sketch of this renowned Poe scholar.]

Marder, Daniel. “Poe: The Demon and Psyche’s Exile,” Exile At Home: A Story of Literature in Nineteenth-century America (Lanharn, Md.: University Press of

America, 1984), pp. 66-107. [Poe is exiled from his culture and the world of men by his pursuit of a dual aesthetic ideal.]

Markus, Manfred. Point of View im Erzahltext: Eine angewandte Typologie am Beispiel der frühen amerikanischen Short Story, insbesondere Poes und Hawthornes (Innebruck: Institut fur Sprachwissenscraft der Universitat Innsbruck, 1985). [Develops a typology of narratorial perspectives using Poe’s and Hawthorne’s short stories as illustrative material.]

Matheson, T. J. “Poe’s ‘The Black Cat’ as a Critique of Temperance Literature,” Mosaic, 19 (Summer 1986), 69-81. [Studies narrator as an alcoholic and analyzes the relationship of evil and human nature. Finds sources in temperance literature.]

Mead, Joan Tyler. “Poe’s ‘The Man That Was Used Up’: Another Bugaboo Campaign,” Studies in Short Fiction, 23 (Summer 1986), 281-286. [Views the story as an attack on polite society of Poe’s day, and asserts that the title applies to both General Smith and the narrator, both of whom engage in bugaboo campaigns and are used up.|

Menides, Laura Jehn. “There But for the Grace of God Go I: Eliot and Williams on Poe,” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 7889. [Analyzes and accounts for differing views of Poe held by Eliot and Williams.]

Miller, Karl. Doubles: Studies in Literary History (London: Oxford University Press, 1985). [One chapter, “The Adventures of Peregrine Poe,” pp. 154-166, relates the motifs of the double and escape in “William Wilson” and “Hans Pfaall.”]

Monteiro, George. “The Poem as Felony,” The Antioch Review, 44 (1986), 209-219. [Discusses the orgies of “The Raven,” and professional and pedagogical adventures with Poe.]

Murakami, Azuma. “Goddesses as the Living — On Poe’s Love Stories and Poems,” Akita Studies in English Language and Literature, 27 (1986).

Nakamura, Tohru. “Poe in Japan . . . (2),” Bulletin of College of General Education, Ibaraki University, 18 (March 1986), 165-179. [Surveys and comments on the studies and criticism of Poe in Japan during the ten years after WWII.]

Nakazaki, Masao. UK. A. Poe’s ‘Hans Pfaall,‘R. A. Locke’s ‘The Moon Hoax,’ and F. Wohler’s Satirical Sketch ‘Des entratheelte Geheimniss der geisten Gahrung,‘” Bulletin of the Faculty of the Liberal Arts, Chutyo University, 24 (4) (March 1986), 1-29. [Explains the three hoaxes of the title and “The Balloon Hoax,” considers the relationships among these works, and discusses the popularity of these pseudo-scientific stories.]

————————. “The Right-Left Ambiguity in Edgar Allan Poe’s Portrait Photography,” Bulletin of the Faculty of the Liberal Arts, Chulryo University, 27 (1) (June 1986), 1-26. [Discusses daguerreotype photography [column 2:] and its mirror image, and explains the right-left ambiguity of photographs of Poe in his last years.]

Odin, Jaishree. “Suggestiveness — Poe’s Writings from the Perspective of Indian Rasa Theory,” Comparative Literature Studies, 23 (Winter 1986), 297-309. [Treats suggestion and its relationship to horror and compares nothingness to rasa.|

Okada, Mitsuo. “A Study of Poe’s ‘The Murders in the Rue Morgue,‘” Journal of the College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, 19 (1) (June 1986), 13-24. [Poe described in this tale what possibility imagination gives to human beings.]

Omans, Glen A. Passion in Poe: The Development of a Critical Term (Baltimore: The Edgar Allan Poe Society, 1986). [Examines the sources and development of Poe’s idea of passion as it relates to his theory of poetry.]

Peirce, Carol Marshall. “‘In the Perilous Realm’: The Fantastic Geographies of Tolkien and Poe,” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 124-136. [Analyzes affinities of the two writers, focusing on the quest motif, landscapes, fantasy, and myth.]

Pellegrin, Jean. “Echanges Linguistiques,” Bulletin Baudelairien, 21 (1986), 96-98. [Poe’s repetend compared to that of Charles Baudelaire.]

Peterson, Dale E. “Abstract: Nabokov and the Poe-etics of Composition,” Nabokovian, No. 16 (Spring 1986), 17-20. [On parody in Poe and Nabokov.]

Phillips, Elizabeth C. “‘His Right of Attendance’: The Image of the Black Man in the Works of Poe and Two of His Contemporaries,” No Fairer Land: Studies in Southern Literature Before 1900, eds. J. Lasley Dameron and James W. Mathews (Troy, N. Y.: Whitson, 1986), pp. 172-184. [Finds connection between Poe’s “The Gold-Bug,” John Tombin’s “The Spanish Adventurer,” and William Gilmore Simms’ The Yemassee.]

Piacentino, Edward J. “Two Critical Notices on Poe in Southern Punch,” Poe Studies, 18 (December 1985), 21-22. [Offers reprints of two laudatory appraisals of Poe dated 31 October and 5 December 1863.]

Pitcher, Edward W. R. “‘To Die Laughing’: Poe’s Allusion to Sir Thomas More in ‘The Assignation,‘. Studies in Short Fiction, 23 (Spring 1986), 197-200. [Considers the work and, in a rejoinder to Richard P. Benton, discusses the importance of the allusion to More.]

Poe, Edgar Allan. The Black Cat (Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1986). [Reprinting of the tale from the 1845 Wiley-Putnam edition, illustrated with eleven wood engravings by Alan James Robinson.]

————————. The Raven, with The Philosophy of Composition (Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1986). [Reprinting of Poe’s poem (the 1845 Lorimer Graham version with author’s corrections) and essay, [page 41:] illustrated with eight wood engravings and an etching by Alan James Robinson.]

The Poe Messenger [Richmond: Poe Foundation] (Autumn 1986). [Includes essays by Anne Page Johns (“MacKenzie Letters, 1908-1914”), Lawrence J. Starsyk (“An Unhappy Master’s Stock and Store: Poe and the Early Work of D. G. Rosetti”), and Jack Leland (.Georgetown Figured in Poe’s ‘Gold-Bug‘”); a new installment of Agnes Bondurant Marcuson’s “The Origins of Richmond’s Poe Museum”; and a variety of other pieces.]

Pollin, Burton R. Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe, VOIB. III and IV: The Brevities: Marginalia, Fifty Suggestions, and Other Works (New York: Gordian Press, 1985). [Critical edition with copious annotations of the “brief essay-notes” Poe contributed in series to various periodicals.]

————————. Insights and Outlooks: Essays on Great Writers (N. Y.: Gordian Press, 1986). [Includes previously published essay on Poe and Thomas Mann.]

————————. “Stoddard’s Elegiac Sonnet on Poe,” Poe Studies, 19 (December 1986), 32-34. [Stoddard’s vilification of Poe temporarily abated with an anonymously published sonnet in the Southern Literary Messenger (1850) ]

Reilly, John E. “Poe in American Drama: Versions of the Man,” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 18-31. [Describes numerous dramatizations of the life and character of Poe and offers excerpts from some presentations.]

Reynolds, David S., ed. George Lippard, Prophet of Protest: Writings of an American Radical, 1822-1851, (N. Y.: Peter Lang, 1986). [Collection of Lippard’s work, including pieces on Poe.]

Robbins, J. Albert. “A New Manuscript of Poe’s ‘For Annie,‘” Studies in Bibliography, 39 (1986), 261-265. [Comparison of existing manuscripts.]

Robinson, Douglas. American Apocalypses: The Images of the End of the World in American Literature (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986). [Poe’s works important throughout this study; Pym is the focus of chapter entitled “Dream’s Body.”]

Rose, Alexander G., III, and Jeffrey Alan Savoye, Such Friends as These: Edgar Allan Poe ’s List of Subscribers to His Dream Magazine (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986). [Poe’s list of possible subscribers and contributors, amply annotated.]

Saunders, Judith P. “‘If This I Saw’: Optic Dilemmas in Poe’s Writings,” American Transcendental Quarterly, 62 (December 1986), 63-80. [Treatment of vision in Poe.]

Scharnhorst, Gary. “Another ‘Night-Sea Journey’: Poe’s ‘MS. Found in a Bottle,‘” Studies in Short Fiction, 22 (Spring 1985), 203-208. [Studies the work as a masterful hoax anticipating Twain’s “The Great Dark” [column 2:] and Barth’s “Night-Sea Journey.”]

Schenkel, Elmar. “Disease and Vision: Perspective on Poe’s ‘The Sphinx,‘” Studies in American Fiction, 13 (Spring 1985), 97-102. [Sees connections between this tale and other works by Poe which juxtapose “a disease with a deceptive vision.”]

Shackelford, Lynne P. “Poe’s ‘The Fall of the House of Usher,‘” Explicator, 45 (Fall 1986), 18-19. [Links Poe’s story with eighteenth-century artist John Henry Fuseli and speculates as to why Poe chose this particular artist to associate with Usher.]

Shapir, Fred R. “Poe’s Early Use of the Word Linguistic,” Notes and Queries, 32 (September 1985), 357. [Mentions Poe’s use of the word in Marginalia in 1846, ten years before its first citation in the OED.]

Shibata, Motoyuki. “Poe and the Unusable Past,” Bulletin of Tokyo Gakugei University, Section II, 37 (February 1986), 111-121. [Examines the diverse and contradictory positions Poe took regarding the project of creating a usable past.]

Shivers, Frank, Jr. “Edgar Allan Poe,” Maryland Wits and Baltimore Bards: A Literary History with Notes on Washington Writers (Baltimore: Maclay, 1985). [Includes useful reprinting of primary documents not readily available elsewhere.]

Stewart, E. Kate. “Another Source for ‘The Black Cat,‘” Poe Studies, 18 (December 1985), 25. [Offers evidence that Poe may have used material from a sketch in the Baltimore Monument for his tale.]

Stoehr, Taylor. “Unspeakable Horror in Poe,” Words and Deeds: Essays on the Realistic Imagination, ed. Taylor Stoehr (New York: AMS Press, 1986), pp. 43-58. [Reprint of 1979 essay on “Ligeia.”]

Tintner, Adeline R. “A Possible Source in Dickens for Poe’s ‘Imp of the Perverse,‘” Poe Studies, 18 (December 1985), 25. [Points to Dickens’ Oliver Twist as a possible source for Poe’s tale and offers evidence concerning Poe’s knowledge of the British author.]

Toyama, Hiroo. “The Movement and the Immobility of the Air in Poe’s Works,” Journal of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Komazawa University, 15 (March 1986), 185-203. [Discusses the implications of wind and immobile air in Poe.]

Uba, George R. “Malady and Motive: Medical History and ‘The Fall of the House of Usher,‘” South Atlantic Quarterly, 85 (Winter 1986), 10-22. [Analyzes the physical illnesses of the Ushers in terms of the prevailing medical knowledge of the day.]

Uchida, Ichigoro. UA. C. Smith’s Portrait of Edgar Allan Poe in The Huntington,” Collected Essays (Kyoritsu Junior College), 28 (February 1985), 31-37. [Discusses the portrait and its artist.]

————————. E. A. Poe and the fin-dc-siccle Illustrations to His Works (Tokyo: Iwasaki Bijutsu, 1986). [page 41:]

————————. “Edgar Allan Poe’s Portraits in His Philadelphia Days, 1838-1844,” Collected Essays (Kyoritsu Junior College), 29 (February 1986), 1-15.

Udono, Etsuko. “Studies of The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym (1),” The 10th Anniversary of Founding Memorial Number (Aichi Prefectural University), (1985), 639656. [Surveys the criticism of Pym chronologicaUy from Marie Bonaparte to David Halliburton.]

————————. “Studies of The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym (2),” Mulberry, 35 (March 1986), 109121. [Surveys the criticism from 1967 to 1973.]

Vines, Lois. “Paul Valery and the Poe Legacy in France,” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 1-8. [Discusses the extent of Poe’s influence on Valery — a long-standing member of the Poe cult in France — and finds they share common literary theories and practices.]

Voloshin, Beverly R. “Explanation in ‘The Fall of the Howe of Usher,‘” Studies in Short Fiction, 23 (Fall 1986), 419-428. [Considers Gothic conventions, relationship of explanation and epistemology, vampirism.]

Walker, I. M. Edgar Allan Poe: The Critical Heritage (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1986). [Offers contemporary reviews, critiques, letters, publicity devices, and obituaries.]

Weiner, Bruce I. “‘That Metaphysical Art’: Mystery and Detection in Poe’s Tales,” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 32-48. [Reaffirms Poe’s position as the “father of the detective story,” but asserts that Poe “manages the solutions of Dupin at the expense of his artistic convictions.” ]

Weisbuch, Robert. Atlantic Double-Cross: American Literature and British Influence in the Age of Emerson (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986). [Examines Poe’s debt in “The Domain of Arnheim” to Coleridge’s “Kubla Kahn” and Shelley’s “Alastor” to shed light on Anglo-American literary relations.]

Wells, Henry W. “Thomas Ollive Mabbott,” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 75-77. [Brief reminiscence of this preeminent Poe scholar.]

Weng, Changhao. “On Edgar Allan Poe,” Foreign Literature Studies, 33 (September 1986), 66-70.

Werner, Craig. “‘The Insurrection of Subjugated Knowledge’: Poe and Ishmael Reed,” Poe and Our Times: Influences and Affinities, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (Baltimore: Baltimore Poe Society, 1986), pp. 144156. [Comments that Poe-esque touches may be found in Reed’s novels, The Free-Lance Pallbearers, The Last Days of Louisiana Red, and Flight to Canada, and asserts that Reed “alternately repudiates and endorses Poe’s vision.”] [column 2:]

Williams, Michael. “Poe’s ’Shadow-A Parable’ and the Problem of Language,” American Literature, 57 (December 1985), 622-632. 1The tale deals with issues of signification and “questions the confident assumption that interpretation recovers a proper and unchanging meaning previously embodied in a text.”]

Witherington, Paul. “The Accomplice in ‘The Tell-Tale Heart,‘” Studies in Short Fiction, 22 (Fall 1985), 471-475. [Suggests that the listener/reader becomes the main character’s accomplice in crime, and questions the distinction between sanity and insanity in the tale.]

Wood, Michael. “Poe’s Tales: The Art of the Impossible,” The Nineteenth-Century American Short Story, ed. A. Robert Lee (Totowa, N. J.: Barnes and Noble, 1986), pp. 13-39. [Deprecation of Poe’s achievement.]

Yamamoto, Tsunemasa. “E. A. Poe — An Ontological Reverie 7,” Journal of Koyasan University, 21 (February 1986), 109-132. [Focuses on the imagery of “The Conqueror Worm,” “The Haunted Palace,” “Dream-Land,” and “To Helen” of 1848.]

Yanase, Kozo. “Psychological Interpretation of ‘The Tell-Tale Heart,‘” Reviews (Jissen Woman’s Junior College), 7 (February 1986).

————————. “Forms of Malice in ‘The Cask of Amontillado,‘” Jissen Studies in English American Literature (Jissen Woman’s Junior College), 16 (March 1986).

Zanger, Jules. “Poe’s ‘Berenice’: Philosophical Fantasy and Its Pitfalls,” The Scope of the Fantastic: Theory, Technique, Major Authors, eds. Robert A. Colllins and Howard D. Pearce (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1985), pp. 135 - 142. [Discusses Poe’s indebtedness to Platonic doctrines.]

————————. “Poe’s Endless Voyage: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym,” Papers on Language and Literature, 22 (Summer 1986), 276-283. [Discusses the tale as it has been interpreted by Jules Verne, Charles Dake, and H. P. Lovecraft, and speculates on possible endings.]

Zimmerman, Elena. “Tragic Ingenue: Memories of Elizabeth Arnold Poe,” No Fairer Land: Studies in Southern Literature Before 1900, eds. J. Lasley Dameron and James W. Mathews (Troy, N. Y.: Whitson, 1986), pp. 123-143. [Includes biographical information and discusses relationship between Poe and his mother.]

Zumbach, Frank T. Edgar Allan Poe: Eine Biographie (Munich, West Germany: Winkler Verlag, 1986). [The first full-length German biography of Poe.] [page 42:]

REVIEWS and REVIEW-ESSAYS

Anon. Notice of Edgar Allan Poe: Poetry and Talcs, ed. Patrick F. Quinn, and Edgar Allan Poe: Essays and Reviews, ed. G. R. Thompson. American Literature, 57 (March 1985), 187-188. [Both editions considered as examples of superior literary talent in their design. Responsible, reassuring textual work that candidly acknowledges the confused state of Poe texts.]

————————. Review of Edgar Allan Poe: Poetry and Talcs, ed. Patrick F. Quinn, and Edgar Allan Poe: Essays and Reviews, ed. G. R. Thompson. The Christian Century, 102 (February 1985), 196. [Dismisses works to which Poe gave his critical attention but notes the appeal of the “forms” that attention took. Sees the volume of poetry and tales as self-promoting. Predicts that these volumes will create “a new Poe readership among informed nonexperts.”]

————————. Review of Sacvan Bercovitch and Myra Jehlen, eds., Ideology and Classic American Literature. American Literature, 58 (December 1986), 672. [Focuses on Poe’s “Man of the Crowd” and works by Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, and Stowe.]

————————. Review of Patricia Ann Carlson, ed., Literature and Lore of the Sea. American Literature, 58 (October 1986), 485. [Focuses on Poe, Cooper, Melville, Whitman, and Rolvaag.]

————————. Review of Tales of Terror, selected and illustrated by Neil Walman. Voice of Youth Advocates, 8 (October 1985), 259. [Considers Poe’s “complex macabre language” as too difficult for average teenagers; therefore, bases its evaluation of “a most chilling volume” on the illustrations.]

Beaver, Harold. Review of Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe, Vol. I, The Imaginary Voyages, ed. Burton R. Pollin. Modern Language Review, 79 (October 1984), 912-914. [Notes the acknowledged continuity between Mabbott and Pollin and praises the compilation of sources and interpretations from the broadest range of commentary. Observes the omission of the Chase and Weddell narratives in the commentary on Pym, but generally is pleased by the “monumental” editorial effort of the “doyen” of Poe scholarship.]

Bennett, Maurice J. Review of Jefferson Humphries, Metapmorphoses of the Raven: Literary Overdeterminedness in France and the South Since Poe. PSA Newsletter, 14 (Spring and Fall, 1986), 5. [A jargon-ridden, disjointed examination of Poe and French and Southern writers — insightful on the latter, murky on Poe.]

Benton, Richard P. “An Introduction to Poe,” Poe Studies, 19 (June 1986), 25. Review of Bettina I. Knapp, Edgar Allan Poe. [A general introduction for beginning readers of Poe — a Jungian and comparative literature approach that omits much of the most recent and interesting criticism.]

————————. Review of Judith Sutherland, The [column 2:] Problematic Fictions of Poe, James, and Hawthorne. PSA Newsletter, 13 (Spring 1985), 1-2. [Considers author’s contentions that her three writers respond critically to Emerson’s assertion of the autonomous ego as germinal. Notes that she focuses on Pym and Poe as the most severe in their questioning.]

Bloom, Harold. “Inescapable Poe,” New York Review of Books, 11 October 1984, p. 23. Review-essay of Edgar Allan Poe: Poetry and Talcs, ed. Patrick F. Quinn, and Edgar Allan Poe: Essays and Reviews, ed. G. R. Thompson. [Another assessment in the tradition of the Anglo-American depreciation of Poe as an artist: James, Elliot, Winters. Poe’s poetry considered as “vulgar,” “tasteless,” and “tone deaf.” Questions whether the famous tales can survive “authentic” criticism. Claims that Poe’s tales function on the level of neurosis, nightmare, myth, not as literature.]

Buell, Lawrence. Review of Brian Harding, American Literature in Context, II: 1850-1865 and Linden Peach, British Influence on the Birth of American Literature. American Literature, 35 (1983), 252-253. [Two only partially successful attempts to establish the trans-Atlantic sources of early nineteenth-century American literature made up of disconnected profiles of disparate quality and usefulness. Buell considers Harding “literate” and “lucid” but Peach “a dissertation rushed too quickly into print.”]

Carlson, Eric W. Review of Douglas Robinson, American Apocalypses: Images of the End of the World in American Literature. PSA Newsletter, 14 (Spring and Fall 1986), 5-6. [Discusses Emerson and especially Poe as originators of definitively American forms of apocalyptic visions.]

————————. Review of Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe. Vol. II, The Brevities, ed. Burton R. Pollin. PSA Newsletter, 13 (Fall 1985), 1. [Printed in the same format as earlier volume, the present ed tion “seems as complete in its primary and secondary matter as possible . . . the product of years of intensive research.”]

————————. Review of The Other Poe: Comedies and Satires, ed. David Galloway. PSA Newsletter, 12 (Spring 1984), 4. [Claims that the edition overstates the case for Poe’s comedies as a context and guide for his serious works by misrepresenting the actual stature of these minor pieces.]

Carlson, Thomas C. Review of Afred Kazin, An American Procession: The Major American Writers from 1810-1950 — The Critical Century. PSA Newsletter, 13 (Spring 1985), 2-3. [Commends Kazin’s impressive treatment of major figures like Emerson, Twain, Adams, but laments his inadequate treatment of Poe.]

Cowan, Bainard. “Read ng Glyphic Writing: Vor-Textual Stratagems,” Southern Review, 19 (1983), 913-918. A review-essay on John T. Irwin’s American Hieroglyphics: The Symbol of the Hieroglyph in the American Renaissance. [Objects to Irwin’s “placing Poe’s Arthur Gordon Pym at the center of his study, radically calling it forth from the marginality it has languished in up to now.”] [page 43:]

Daiker, Donald A. Review of Kent Ljungquist, The Grand and the Fair: Poe’s Landscape Aesthetics and Pictorial Techniques. Studies in Short Fiction, 23 (Summer 1986), 339. [Outlines Poe’s aesthetic development from the vision of sublime grandeur to the focus on the circumscribed interior of the mind.]

Dameron, J. Lasley, and Frank C. Weightman. Review of Burton R. Pollin, Word Index to Poe ’s Fiction. Computers and the Humanities, 1 (January 1984), 59-60. [Reviewers consider this a useful tool for students of Poe’s style and vocabulary that completes the necessary set of reference works for most textual work on Poe.]

Eddings, Dennis W. Review of Edgar Allan Poe Issue, ed. Frederick S. Frank, of The Sphinx: A Magazine of Literature and Society, 4 (1985). PSA Newsletter, 13 (Fall 1985), 2. [Singles out articles by Kent Ljungquist, Martin Roth, and Nicholas Rudd ck as particular contributions to reading Poe, while dismissing the remainder of the volume as “misleading” and “flummery.”]

Faris, Wendy B. Review of Ana Hernandez del Castillo, Keats, Poe, and the Shaping of Cortzár’s MythoPoesis. Comparative Literature, 36 (Summer 1984), 285-286. [Notes the effectiveness of placing three authors in a matrix of Jungian myth and psychology. The study’s inherent weakness is an insufficient focus on Cortazár’s uniqueness, but the work successfully establishes the primacy of Poe’s d rect and indirect influence through his pervasiveness in Latin American letters.]

Fisher, Benjamin Franklin, IV. Review of Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe, Vol. II, The Brevities, ed. Burton R. Pollin. American Literature, 58 (May 1986), 284286. [Compensates for the incompleteness of other Poe editions, combining previously unavailable miscellanies in a single volume. Features inconsistencies in its scholarly apparatus, but will serve as the “standard edition” for the immediate future.]

————————. Review of Burton R. Pollin, Word Index to Poe’s Fiction. Journal of English and German Philology, 84 (January 1985), 153-154. [Considers volume an important, up-to-date reference “rude, particularly in light of the inadequacies of existing Poe concordances and in the absence of a concordance of his entire production.]

Fuller, Edmund. “The Library of America,” The Wall Street Journal, 28 August 1984, p. 24. Review of Edgar Allan Poe: Poetry and Talcs, ed. Patrick F. Quinn, and Edgar Allan Poe: Essays and Reviews, ed. G. R. Thompson, as well as Crane and Jefferson volumes in series. [Stresses the unique comprehensiveness of the collection of Poe’s critical and journalistic work; comments on the attempt to establish an authentically accurate text in the Quinn volume.]

Goldhurst, William. Review of Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe, Vol. I, The Imaginary Voyages, ed. Burton R. Pollin. The South Atlantic Quarterly, 80 (Summer 1983), 346. [The only modern scholarly edition of Pym, “Pfaall,” and “Rodman,” with half of the text devoted to Pollin’s “heroic” scholarly apparatus.]

Greenlaw, M. Jean. “Books for Adolescents,” Journal of Reading, 26 (February 1983), 464-468. Review of Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, selected by Dwight MacDonald. [Observes the particular appeal of Poe’s major poems to young people through the themes of “romance and love lost and mourned.” Notes the scholarly commentary on Poe’s life and place in American literature, and the inclusion of several critical pieces on his poetry.]

Hennelly, Mark M., Jr. Review of The Naiad Voice: Essays on Poe’s Satiric Hoaxing, ed. Dennis W. Eddings. PSA Newsletter, 12 (Spring 1984), 2-3. [Generally endorses the collection’s engagement with Poe’s conception of satire as serious and his interest in separating “serious” from gullible readers. Sees Eddings’ volume as participating in the debate as to whether Poe’s universe is disintegrating or harmonious.]

Jones, D. A. N. “The Wilson Doctrine,” The Listener, 113 (4 April 1985), 26. Review of Edgar Allan Poe: Poetry and Talcs, ed. Patrick F. Quinn, and Edgar Allan Poe: Essays and Reviews, ed. G. R. Thompson, and other titles in series. [Concentrates primarily on the literary and cultural prejudices that have kept some American literary works out of print throughout much of this century and thus necessitated the Library of America project.]

Justin, Henri. “The Fold is the Thing: Poe Criticism in France in the Last Five Years,” Poe Studies, 16 (December 1983), 25-30. [Review-essay on French criticism of Poe since 1980, focusing on significant discussions, somewhat outside the Derridean-Lacanian mode, of major texts such as Eureka, “Ligeia,” and “The Oval Portrait.”]

Kesterson, David B. “New Resources for Poe Studies,” Southern Literary Journal, 15 (1983), 102-106. Review-essay on Burton R. Pollin, Word Index to Poe ’s Fiction, and the same author’s edition of Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe, Vol. I, The Imaginary Voyages.

Ketterer, David. Review of William Patrick Day, In the Circles of Fear and Desire: A Study of Gothic Fantasy. PSA Newsletter, 14 (Spring and Fall 1986), 3. [Considering Poe’s work as evidence for the derivation of the detective story from gothicism, the study is “detailed,” “densely argued,” “persuasive.”]

Ljungquist, Kent. “The Growth of Poe Texts,” Review, Vol. V (1983), eds. James O. Hoge and James L. W. West II. Review-essay on Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Vol. I-III, ed. Thomas Ollive Mabbott, and Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe, Vol. I, The Imaginary Voyages, ed. Burton R. Pollin. [Cites Mabbott’s Poems as “a major scholarly achievement” but criticizes his editing of the tales, particularly his inexplicable occasional reliance on Griswold sources. Criticizes Pollin for following Mabbott’s example of “mixing painstaking scholarship and questionable textual work.”]

————————. Review of William Patrick Day, In the Circles of Fear and Desire: A Study of Gothic Fantasy. Studies in Short Fiction, 23 (Spring 1986), 222-223. [page 44:] [An attempt to illustrate the persistence of Gothic concerns in modernist and Freudian work — heavy on theoretic superstructure, short on specific interpretation.]

————————. “Poe,” American Literary Scholarship: An Annual, 1983, ed. Warren French (Durham: Duke University Press, 1985), pp. 45-59. Review of Poe scholarship for 1983. [Notes the dominant influence of contemporary French criticism in directing attention to the self-conscious nature of Poe’s writing.]

————————. Review of Marion Montgomery, Why Poe Drank Liquor. PSA Newsletter, 12 (Spring 1984), 4. [Sees work as wide-ranging, ambitious, unfocused. Condescending toward Poe whom it uses as a “foil in a campaign to ascertain the validity of a Christian vision” in which Poe emerges as a “false prophet.”]

Marler, Robert F., Jr. Review of Eugene Current-Garcia, The American Short Story: A Critical History. American Literature, 58 (October 1986), 433-435. [Most helpful as a quick survey work that builds on G. R. Thompson’s study of Poe’s meanings conceded in comedy.]

Nevius, Blake. “Poe’s Landscape Aesthetics,” Poe Studies, 18 (December 1985), 26-27. Review of Kent Ljungquist, The Grand and the Fair: Poe’s Landscapes Aesthetics and Pictorial Techniques. [Emphasis primarily on landscape theory, but a useful study of Poe’s treatment of nature in his work.]

O‘Brien, Geoffrey. “The Secret Life of Edgar Allan Poe,” Village Voice Literary Supplement, October 1984, p. 1. Review of Edgar Allan Poe: Poetry and Tales, ed. Patrick Quinn, and Edgar Allan Poe: Essays and Reviews, ed. G. R. Thompson. [Considers Poe’s work as the narrative assertion of personality and explores the permutations of the myth of that personality in the popular imagination. Regards these editions as a welcome broadening of perspective to reveal a Poe concerned primarily with literature and writing, and, above all, engaged with the literary society of his time.]

Omans, Glen A. Review of Kent Ljungquist, The Grand and the Fair: Poe’s Landscape Aesthetics and Pictorial Techniques. PSA Newsletter, 13 (Fall 1985), 2-3. [A “suggestive text” that includes an impressive bibliography. Omans focuses on the author’s analysis of Poe’s subtle use of landscape to indicate interior reality, and notes discussion of Poe’s manipulation of other nineteenth-century literary traditions.]

Pease, Dondd. “Marginal Politics and ‘The Purloined Letter’: A Review Essay,” Poe Studies, 16 (June 1983), 18-23. Review-essay on Jacques Lacan, “Seminar on ‘The Purloined Letter,‘” trans. Jeffrey Mehlman, Yale French Studies, No. 48 (1972); Jacques Derrida, “The Purveyor of Truth,” trans. Willis Domingo, et al., Yale French Studies, No. 52 (1975); and Barbara Johnson, “The Frame of Reference: Poe, Lacan, and Derrida,” Yale French Studies, Nos. 55-56 (1977), rpt. in Psychoanalysis and the Question of the Text, ed. Geoffrey Hartman, and in Barbara Johnson, The Critical Difference: Essays in the Contemporary Rhetoric of Reading. [Pease notes the reciprocal relationship between [column 2:] recent French criticism and Poe texts as one of mutual validation. Focuses on the debate over “signifier” and “signified” in “The Purloined Letter” and Johnson’s subversive mediation of that debate.]

Pollin, Burton R. Review of Nicola Gordon Bowe, Harry Clarke: His Graphic Art. PSA Newsletter, 14 (Spring and Fall 1986), 4. [Significant for Poe scholars interested in the development of Poe illustration.]

————————. Review of Jefferson Humphries, Metamorphoses of the Raven: Literary Overdeterminedness in France and the South Since Poe. American Literature, 58 (October 1986), 435-437. [This work a “derivative” conglomeration of stylish theories, and a “cavalier” treatment of “chronology, casual relationships, and objective evidence in general.”]

Quinn, Patrick F. “The Poe Edition: Annotating Pym,” Poe Studies, 16 (June 1983), 14-16. Review of Collected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe, Vol. I: The Imaginary Voyages, ed. Burton R. Pollin. [Focuses on Pym but commends Pollin for equally exhaustive scholarship on all three tales. Notes that the overwhelming commentary is almost entirely negative — it highlights Poe’s inaccuracies of fact, inconsistencies of detail, and infelicities of syntax and grammar. Remarks the absence of any apparent principle for determining Poe’s intentional from his unintentional lapses, and questions Pollin’s reading of Pym as at once a “simple” adventure story and a sophisticated satire.]

————————. “Poe’s Other Audience,” Poe Studies, 18 (June 1985), 13-14. Review of The Other Poe: Comedies and Satire., ed. David Galloway, and The Naiad Voice: Essays on Poe ’s Satiric Hoaxing, ed. Dennis W. Eddings. [Criticizes Galloway’s preface for its lack of analysis, identification of uniquely Poesque elements in these tales, and sufficient justification for attention paid them. Eddings’ volume a “useful addition” to secondary sources with reprints of major articles by Griffith, Thompson, et d., 1954-1977, but Quinn questions fundamental premise of approach as set forth in Michael Allen’s theory of Poe’s appeal to a dual audience.]

Rash, Ron. Review of Marion Montgomery, Why Poe Drank Liquor. The South Carolina Review, 16 (Spring 1984), 140. [Laments that the author’s obtrusively orthodox Christianity may deprive this study of a deserved academic audience. Valuable on O‘Connor and Poe who are contrasted, to the latter’s detriment.]

Reece, James B. “A Gathering of Poe Essays,” Poe Studies, 16 (1983), 41-44. Review of Poe-Purri: Edgar Allan Poe Issue, ed. Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV, University of Mississippi Studies in English, NS 3 (1982). [A summary notice of each of the sixteen, widely-varying essays in the volume.]

Renza, Louis A. “Poe and the Marginalia of American Criticism,” Poe Studies, 17 (December 1984), 2427. Review of John Carlos Rowe, Through the Custom-Howe: Nineteenth-Century American Fiction and Modern Theory. [Notes the work aa part of a recent revisionist trend in American literary scholarship that questions the “renaissance” hailed by F. O. [page 45:] Matthiessen. Work is essentially Derridean in impulse and procedure whose stated goal is to rescue certain marginal works by canonical nineteenth-century figures and to question the conservative bias that artificially separates genres.]

Ringe, Dondd A. Review of Eugene Current-Garcia, The American Short Story Before 1850: A Critical History. South Atlantic Review, 51 (November 1986), 149-151. [Primarily for the genera reader — offers an obsolete scholarly vocabulary but a good introduction.]

Robbins, Bruce. Review of Eveline Pinto, Edgar Poe et l‘art d‘inventer. PSA Newsletter, 13 (Fall 1985), 3. [Regards this as a basically misguided attempt to replace the French symbolist Poe with one more representative of his time and place. Good at reconciling Poe the rationalist with the artist; weak at aligning the two views of Poe with the sociology of the period.]

Sessions, William A. “Waking the Long Memory,” Georgia Review, 39 (Fall 1985), 629-634. Review of Marion Montgomery, The Prophetic Poet and the Spirit of the Age: Vol. I, Why Flannery O‘Connor Stayed Home; Vol. II, Why Poe Drank Liquor; Vol. III, Why Hawthorne was Melancholy. [Notes O‘Connor as the central figure of the trilogy, so that Poe and Hawthorne are seen through the lens of her work. Despite his inadvertent provincialism, Montgomery places these writers in a genuine Southern intellectual tradition as opposed to the primitive and the gothic that popularly define Southern fiction.]

Stauffer, Donald Barlow. Review of Ana Hernandez del Castillo, Keats, Poe, and the Shaping of Cortázar’s MythoPoesis. PSA Newletter, 14 (Spring and Fd 1986), 7-8. [Focuses on the influence of Keats and Poe on the mythic concerns of the Argentine novelist. Illuminates Cortázar as a Poe critic.]

———————— . “Poe,” American Literary Scholarship: An Annual, 1984, ed. J. Albert Robbins (Durham, N. C.: Duke University Press, 1984), pp. 43-54. [Review of Poe scholarship for 1982. [A year of particularly high quality, especially the work of J. A. Leo Lemay and the University of Mississippi Studies in English special issue on Poe.]

Stewart, E. Kate. Review of Frederick S. Frank, Guide to the Gothic: An Annotated Bibliography of Criticism. PSA Newsletter, 13 (Fall 1985), 4. [Organized according to country of origin, special subject areas, and author — an “invaluable asset” to Poe scholars. Poe section distinguished by material on his relationship to Hoffmann, Lovecraft, and Brown.]

Thomas, Dwight. Review of Such Friends as These: Edgar Allan Poe ’s List of Subscribers and Contributors to His Dream Magazine, eds. Alexander G. Rose III and Jeffrey Allan Savoye. PSA Newsletter, 14 (Spring and Fd 1986), 3. [Valuable detail for scholars interested in Poe biography. Annotated Index.]

Warner, Michael. Review of John Carlos Rowe, Through the Custom-House: Nineteenth-Century American Fiction and Modern Theory. Modern Language Notes, 98 (December 1983), 1349-1352. [Concludes by discounting [column 2:] Rowe’s superficially provocative attack on traditional American literary studies and places readings in an established tradition. Notes discussion of Poe but singles out treatment of Thoreau and James.]

Weiner, Bruce I. Review of Donald Ringe, American Gothic: Imagination and Reason in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction. PSA Newsletter, 12 (Spring 1984), 3. [“A generally reliable and worthwhile introduction”; adds little to specific Poe readings but is helpful in placing entire mode in relation to its European sources.]

Wilbur, Richard. “Terror Wasn‘t His Only Talent,” New York Times Book Review, 9 September 1984, p. 3. Review of Edgar Allan Poe: Essays and Reviews, ed. G. R. Thompson. [Welcomes a volume that makes Poe the critic more readily accessible. Views the critical work as a helpful perspective from which to approach Poe’s “ulterior” motives in the tales; considers stylistic and narrative eccentricities associated with the fiction to be conscious devices of Poe the “philosophical” critic.]

Wilson, Christopher. Review of Douglas Robinson, American Apocalypses: The Image of the End of the World in American Literature. American Literature, 58 (December 1986), 670-672. [Rescues Poe from “deconstructionist ahistorism,” studying the aesthetic and moral value of the American tradition of meditating on annihilation.]


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[S:0 - PSDR, 1980]